Don’t underestimate the power of mist

by , on
Aug 1, 2017
The same lifebuoy in the sun, with mountains in the back

Bella is sitting on the top, looking down

 

You have probably already seen our ninja pictures from the super misty day a few nights ago – if not check them out here! But we can’t really leave it there, because when we woke up after two days in this milky world, the sun revealed something completely different!

Bella is sitting on the top of a cilff

 

We talked with Kian, the photographer from Unstad Artic Surf that we where thinking about going to Senja. Then he persuaded us to go to ”this beautiful island of Husøy”. He didn’t really explain why it was so fantastic, but in his excited way of talking, we felt that it had to be something special.

But then we got here, to a tiny island all covered in big houses. There isn’t any space left for anything else than small roads, peoples tiny backyards and houses. So many houses on such a small space. We couldn’t really understand what Kian had been talking about. We went for a walk, pretended to be ninjas, and spent most of these two days reading and talking. We where to tired to drive somewhere else since we had been in the car for around 12 hours the other day.

 

Carl in the mist

 

And when we woke up on the third day we where happy that we hadn’t just hastened further to a new location. The beauty had revealed itself out of the mist. Here Carl is standing on the same spot with only one day apart, crazy huh!?

 

Carl standing on the same spot but in the sun with a beautiful scenery

 

And look at the harbor the different days:

 

The harbor of Husøy in the mist

 

The harbor of Husøy in the sun

 

It was like going from some kind of post apocalyptic dystopia (since we didn’t see any people at all during the misty days) to a paradise island in Asia!

 

A lifebuoy in the mist

 

The same lifebuoy in the sun, with mountains in the back

 

If you want to visit Husøy you can either free camp along the road leading to the island. Or you can stand in the harbor where you have both electricity, water and possibility to empty your toilet and waste water. It will cost you 150 NOK or 15 Euro. We ended up staying in the harbor because when we drove here we didn’t even see the potential spots along the way. But i hope you get better weather if you go! ★

 

Doris is parked in the harbour in husøy

Hiking up magic Segla

by , on
Jul 31, 2017
Bella is standing strong in the mountain, with the Girls rule T-shirt

Doris is standing with the water and mountains in the background

 

After leaving Husøy we went to the other side of the fjord and the small village called Fjordgard. Probably most famous for being located on the foot of Senjas highest mountain Segla (639 m), that we where very eager to get up on. Unfortunately I didn’t feel well and crashed in the back of Doris with some kind of fever. But that didn’t stop Carl from going.

 

Carl is running over the mountain

 

Or going isn’t the right word, since he decided to run up!? After more than a year with knee problems that have stopped him from running as much as he want to. He got really inspired by the meeting with @thegreatnortherntrails some days ago.

 

Carl i standing besides Segla

 

He came down happier than ever with a new found energy that you can only get from achieving something that you have longed for, for a long time. In the evening I started to feel a bit better and we had a barbecue just by the side of the fjord. There we met a guy that grew up here in Fjordgard, who had brought his family and some friends who also had kids, to see this magic place. When he heard how long it had taken Carl to run up and down Segla, he got really impressed. Since Norwegians are famous for there outdoor interest and for beeing so sporty – this reaction made Carls day (and probably the entire trip)!

 

The magic view from segla

 

The next day I was feeling better and after seeing some of Carls pictures from the top, I really wanted to get up there myself. The only problem is that I’m really afraid of heights… ”But I thought she was climbing?” one might ask. Mostly I do bouldering whitch is the kind of climbing that’s a bit mor technical and only like four or five meters high. And when I occasionally climb higher I can handle my fear because I know that someone I trust is standing on the ground making sure that I won’t fall.

 

Bella is standing with her "Girls rule" T-shirt and looking over the mountains

 

When I’m hiking up steep paths like this, the fear can be close to paralyzing. It was the same when I hiked up Reinebringen (448 m) on Lofoten two years ago. For every step I go higher, my imagination plays tricks on me and replay a movie inside my head where I slip and fall to my death. I know that a lot of people have hiked up Segla before me but as it is with fear, it doesn’t really help with logic. There’s plenty of people that are afraid of spiders and snakes in Sweden, even though we don’t have any deadly spices. That doesn’t make the fear less real.

So even though I stopped somewhere between the ridge and the top, around 500 meters up, I’m so proud of myself for pushing it so far! I think that we’re often to occupied with reaching a certain goal, that we don’t give ourselves credit for the things we managed to do up until we reached our limit. The most important thing is to never stop pushing our limits and keep believing that we can!

 

Bella is standing strong in the mountain, with the Girls rule T-shirt

 

Carl is resting

 

We went back to the ridge at 350 meters and enjoyed our coffee that we brought. The view was just spectacular from there!

 

Carl is walking in the mist

 

The weather is changing fast here and as we sat there we felt the wind getting colder and we could see how the mist was drifting over the ridge. closer to the other top. It looked so cool and we just had to go there!

 

Carl is walking in the mist on Segla

 

Bella is walking in the mist

 

According to some guides that we found on the internet, the hike should take around 3-4 hours and it is supposed to be ”relatively easy”. The time is almost over estimated but it being easy is very relative. It is quite steep at a few places and some parts have either a lot of stones or nothing but mud, witch makes it easy to slip. But I would say that even for me that’s afraid of heights, it’s quite okey all the way up to the ridge. And the view from there is amazing so don’t hesitate to do the hike even if your’e not aiming for the top! ★

 

Bella is laughing up on Segla with her "Girls rule" T-shirt

#Vanlife at its best!

by , on
Jul 29, 2017

Sometimes you just stumble upon a spot that is so nice that you don’t ever want to leave. This is one of them! Our plan was to leave today but we just couldn’t. We’ll show you why soon – just been to busy exploring the surroundings ✌

You’re not ever in such a hurry

by , on
Jul 25, 2017

I wrote this text a few days back, when I was still a bit shaken by something that had happened a few hours earlier. Now we’re safe and happy in Unstad, Lofoten – but I still feel like sharing this with you all. As a reminder to keep things cool on the roads.

If you search for a route up to Lofoten on Google maps, it will most surtenly tell you to drive trough Sweden. That’s what we did last time we where there, two years ago. But as you already know, we wanted to see more of Norway this time and ignored the suggested route even though our one would take hours longer. But we’re not in a hurry.

Even though we’re not in a hurry, we where eager to get to Lofoten yesterday, after our stops and detours along the way. It’s easy to get caught in some kind of race where all that matters is miles and hours on the road.

But then something didn’t happen, that woke us up. It didn’t happen, but it was close. Maybe not as close as it felt.

We slept some kilometers outside of Levanger and had a look at the old ruin of a monastery before we got out on the E6 going north. I don’t know how highways look where you come from, but me and Carl are used to two lanes in each direction and a central barrier. The roads we drove on yesterday looked more like small country roads back home. But the traffic is still very busy with people on their way to and from their cottages, tourist busses and heavy trucks carrying I don’t know what up and down the seemingly narrow roads. 

One lane in each direction and nothing but yellow marks on the ground to separate the traffic going south and north.

And then that car. Some kind of SUV, where the driver decided that he or she was in such a hurry that it was worth to do an overtaking even though it was impossible to see far enough on the road ahead. On the road where we showed up.

I don’t know, it might not have been so close. But the moments that went by, when I went from annoyed over such a stupid behaviour, to not seeing how that SUV would be able to get back between the cars in the right lane. To tense all my muscles, preparing for the crash. Feeling how Calle hit the breaks. And then, the SUV getting back to it’s own side of the road, way to late.

Those moments stuck and made us forever remember; that we’re never in such a hurry. 

After this we drove off the E6 and took a smaller road with less traffic and lower speed limits. We took our time to look at the scenery and stop to take pictures. We arrived to Lofoten a few days later, but with peace in mind. 

Please, drive safe!